Research

Research Areas

On this page, you can find several examples of our work. Do not hesitate to contact us about more information. We looking forward to work with you!

Mobile, web, IoT

We provide full stack developement from the UX design, development of mobile and web apps as well as integration of IoT devices etc.

Datamining, NLP or CV

We are able to deal with datamining techniques, spatial analysis, processing of (un)structured texts or image processing.

Geospatial Analysis

Our research focuses also on identifying the impacts of climate change, related migration and resilience strategies.

Thinking about a Ph.D. thesis?

Here are some examples of Ph.D. theses that are currently supervised by our researchers.

Contact us
Obtaining information from normative texts through natural language-based interfaces

What if the chatbot can find appropriate information automatically in formal documents like study regulations or insurance policies? Without training for specific questions.

Processing of spatial terms in unstructured text

Asking chatbot for some information regarding Washington and he is constantly returning information about Washington, D.C.? Annoying, isn’t it? What if the chatbot can understand the spatial context of your queries.

Use of natural language analysis for improved communication tools for business intelligence

Business Intelligence apps are the utmost important tools for decision making of any manager. However, they can be quite complex for untrained people. What if you can just ask for data using natural language?

Smart University

Improving city or village is not easy. It requires the participation of many people: from citizens to city councilors and mayors. Let’s start with the university.

Each smart city solution usually represents a significant investment, and the evaluation of efficiency often takes years. That is why we focused on smaller goals. To start with, let’s change our universities. Each university is almost a small town with its inhabitants: teachers, researchers and students. Our project focuses on finding technical solutions that can make life easier for different communities of people in a university environment. The research is based on three pillars. The first pillar is the server backend for data synchronization and data analysis. The second pillar is the sensory network. The sensor network is used to collect information, from a temperature to the number of people in a particular room. The third pillar is a mobile application My MENDELU that provides information to users. Our goal is to provide users with the right information at the right time and in the right place. Currently, we provide modules with schedule & tasks, canteen information (with filters based on alergens), indoor map with searching and FAQ module. We have over 2000 active users of our application MENDELU. 

However, we are not focused solely on a mobile application. We are also developing solutions such as smart information panels that are able to change content with regard to the users in their vicinity, chatbot that is able to help the users with different study problems, indoor localization based on bluetooth beacons and other interesting solutions.

Moreover, we developed location-based mobile applications even for Brno-North city district or Envipartner company.
See our projects on Contracted R&D page.

Want to deploy Smart University? 
We will gladly share our infrastructure…

Chatbots for Enterprises: Outlook

Chatbots are going to be the main tool for automated conversations with customers. Still, there is no consistent methodology for choosing a suitable chatbot platform for a particular business. This paper proposes a new method for chatbot platform evaluation. To describe the current state of chatbot platforms, two high-level approaches to chatbot platform design are discussed and compared. WYSIWYG platforms aim to simplicity but may lack some advanced features. All-purpose chatbot platforms require extensive technical skills and are more expensive but give their users more freedom in chatbot design. We provide an evaluation of six major chatbot solutions. The proposed method for the chatbot selection is demonstrated on two sample businesses – a large bank and a small taxi service.

Kostelník, Pavel — Pisařovic, Ivo — Muroň, Mikuláš — Procházka, David — Dařena, František: Chatbots for Enterprises: Outlook. In Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis. 2019. 67(6):1541-1550. ISSN 1211-8516.

Smart displays: Personalisation of information panels

Information panels are a common part of university or administrative buildings. We can see large panels with news or social media feeds as well as small displays on conference rooms with information about their occupancy. All these panels usually present general information without any relation to a present audience. Presentation of personalised information for a particular user can be very helpful; however, for such personalisation we must take into account many aspects: identification of users in the display vicinity, sharing of the screen among multiple users etc. This paper is focused on the architecture of such system that allows presenting customised information on information panels for users within university buildings. Our solution allows detection of a user via Bluetooth beacons. The selected close display then presents information related to the user. In case there are multiple users in the display vicinity, the system evaluates their requirements and decides how to share the display. 

Pisařovic, Ivo — Koubek, Tomáš — Ondroušek, Vít — Procházka, David
Smart displays: Personalisation of information panels. Acta Universitatis agriculturae et silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis. 2018. v. 66, no. 5, p. 1307–1314. ISSN 1211-8516.

Providing Customised Information Panel Content Based on User Behavioral Patterns

Although mobile applications are commonly using user location and behavior to provide relevant content, public information panels usually lack the ability to adjust the content for a particular user or a group of users. Therefore, we focused on the development of information panels that are able, in combination with a mobile application, to collect anonymous location data about the users, identify key behavioral patterns and provide content that is relevant for the users in the panel vicinity. The key property of our solution is the anonymity of the collected information and privacy in general. The proposed algorithm consists of the data clustering and subsequent analysis. Described solution can be used in any public building or campus that the users visit regularly.

Pisařovic, Ivo — Procházka, David — Vybíral, Dan — Procházková, Jana
Providing customised information panel content based on user behavioral patterns.In Mendel. Brno: Brno University of Technology. 2018, p. 173–180. ISSN 1803-3814.

Spatial Data Driven Evaluation of City Locations

Moving to a new home or setting a new bureau in a new city is always difficult. One does not have knowledge about suitable locations; therefore, people are frequently unpleasantly surprised. High traffic noise, long distance to shops or high criminal activity are just few of many possible disturbing aspects. Certainly, there are many data sources that can help to see some particular aspect of the city life. Nonetheless, it is extremely complex and time‑consuming task to browse through large data sets and com‑pare provided information. Therefore, we developed a solution that comprises many different data sets that describe the city environment and created set of straightforward indices such as environment, safety, shopping etc. The users just provide the application his/her preferences and the application finds locations that are most suitable for particular cause. The application is presented on the example of the Brno city area.

Muroň, Mikuláš — Procházka, David Spatial data driven evaluation of city locations. Acta Universitatis agriculturae et silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis. 2018. v. 66, no. 5, p. 1301–1306. ISSN 1211-8516.

Searching in 3D space

Laser scanning technology creates a completely new research area. So far, the researchers were developing algorithms for the identification of the objects in 2D images. Now, we must deal with 3D scans.

Nature, villages, cities – all of them are constantly changing, and we need to monitor these changes efficiently. Cities need to monitor the status of traffic signs, lighting, traffic signs, and so on. Companies need to monitor the state of tangible and intangible assets. It costs considerable time and money. We are therefore looking for ways to effectively monitor and manage the environment and property.

In the field of Remote Sensing, we deal with point cloud processing. We try to process the point clouds and find the objects they contain in an automated manner. So far we have focused on finding road markings and traffic signs. Now we are focusing on the detection of complex objects. This research aims to map out very quickly and precisely large areas and save time and resources.

Automatic lane marking extraction from point cloud into polygon map layer

Optimization of road networks is a common concern worldwide, primarily for safety purposes. Because the extent of these networks is substantial, automation of their inventory is highly desirable. This paper concentrates on the road inventory process that is necessary for regular maintenance. The key part of our road marking detection and reconstruction is based on spanning tree usage. The spanning trees are obtained from alpha shapes of the detected road markings. The spanning trees application enables the reliable identification of the road markings and precise reconstruction of their contours even with noisy data. Our method processes the point cloud data obtained from LiDAR measurements, and provides a common vector layer with road lane polygons. Such a vector layer is stored in a common file format supported by the majority of geographical information systems, thus producing an output that can be conveniently used for decision-making based on the road inventory process.

Procházka, David — Procházková, Jana — Landa, Jaromír
Automatic lane marking extraction from point cloud into polygon map layer. European Journal of Remote Sensing. 2019. v. 52, no. S1, p. 26–39. ISSN 2279-7254.

Development of models for forest variable estimation from airborne laser scanning data using an area-based approach at a plot level

Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is increasingly used in the forestry over time, especially in a forest inventory process. A great potential of ALS lies in providing quick high precision data acquisition for purposes such as measurements of stand attributes over large forested areas. Models were developed using an area-based approach to predict forest variables such as wood volume and basal area. The solution was performed through developing an object-oriented script using Python programming language, Python Data Analysis Library (Pandas), which represents a very flexible and powerful data analysis tool in conjunction with interactive computational environment the IPython Notebook. Several regression models for estimation of forest inventory attributes were developed at a plot level.

Sabol, Jan — Procházka, David — Patočka, Zdeněk
Development of models for forest variable estimation from airborne laser scanning data using an area-based approach at a plot level. Journal of forest science. 2016. v. 62, no. 3, p. 137–142. ISSN 1212-4834.

User Friendly Interaction with Natural Objects in Web Map Applications Based on Object Recognition

The maps become a common tool for many users. We can nd a wide range of solutions from simple search applications to advanced location intelligence tools. In most cases, aerial or satellite images are used as a background. Above this background, other map layers are presented and used for the actual interaction. Our approach is focused on the mentioned background. Aerial and satellite images comprise a huge amount of objects, but it is virtually impossible to interact with them. This paper proposes a new kind of user interface that allows to interact with these natural objects.

Procházka, David — Chodúr, Martin
User friendly interaction with natural objects in web map applications based on object recognition. Acta Universitatis agriculturae et silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis. 2016. v. 64, no. 6, p. 2109–2116. ISSN 1211-8516.

Migration, development and enviromental changes

One of the biggest challeng for “Western societies” in the last decade is the massive migration. This challenge has many dimensions.

Countries are making efforts to reduce or manage migration to their own countries, or to integrate immigrants into their civilization structures, cities and economies. We have been dealing with this problem for hundreds of years and the responses vary according to individual situations. On the other hand, some “solutions” such as “Fortress Europe concept” have been the subject of negotiations repeatedly for several decades. In order to make a meaningful attempt to give rules to immigration, the processes firstly must be understood. And to know the real causes of migration, which is not easy. In many cases, there are a number of interrelated factors dealing with development, remittances, and other economic and social factors. Therefore, research on this topic requires a multidisciplinary approach.
Our team has decided to focus on research into the causes of migration in the countries of origin and their analysis using a variety of tools that will allow us to better understand through visualization in the geographical spatial regime.

Quite special and relatively scarce factors are environmental changes. Although natural resources such as drinking water or soil may seem inexhaustible, in many cases the reality is quite the opposite. Long-term environmental changes or natural disasters can fundamentally affect the lives of the people in the area and thus take them natural resources, dwelling or subsistence away. Exhaustion of agricultural areas, floods, hurricanes and other natural or man-made changes along with economic causes lead people to migrate to cities. People in the affected areas are forced to leave their homes and seek livelihood elsewhere.


But is it always so? But why do people not move from areas often affected by floods, droughts, hurricanes or other impacts of environmental change, natural disasters or climatic extremes? Or why does only part of the affected population out-migrate while the others stay? Did the environmental factors affect the current population movement to Europe from Syria and other Middle Eastern and Sub-Saharan African countries since 2015?


And the dynamics of these processes, the behavior of the inhabitants of the affected areas, their perception of environmental changes, their degree of resilience, the decision to migrate or to stay belong to the main research topics of this research group.

Does climate change influence people’s migration decisions in Maldives?

The influence of climate change and perceptions of it on people’s migration decisions has received significant prominence, especially for people living on low-lying islands. To contribute to this literature, this paper uses Maldives as a case study for exploring the research question: How does climate change influence or not influence people’smigration decisions in Maldives? Previous work tends to start from a disciplinary climate change perspective, while this study combines migration, mobility, and island studies perspectives, within which climate change sits. As well, rather than focusing on the area around the capital, Malé, as with many previous studies, the 113 interviews here were conducted in eight islands across three atolls. The method was qualitative, semistructured, face-to-face interviews using purposive sampling of ordinary people. Contrary to a view of islanders preparing to flee their islands as “climate change refugees”, the interviewees provided nuanced and varied responses. They rarely identified the potential of future impacts due to climate change as influencing their migration-related decisions. When migration was considered, it was chiefly internal movement seeking a better standard of living via improved services, better living conditions, and more job opportunities. If migration related to potential climate change impacts might happen, then it was assumed to be in the future for decisions then. This lack of influence of climate change-related perceptions on Maldivians’ migration decisions fits well within island mobilities studies, from which climate change perspectives could adopt wider contexts.
Kelman, Ilan — Orlowska, Justyna — Upadhyay, Himani — Stojanov, Robert — Webersik, Christian — Simonelli, Andrea C — Procházka, David — Němec, Daniel
Does climate change influence people’s migration decisions in Maldives?. Climatic Change. 2019. v. 153, no. 1-2, p. 285–299. ISSN 0165-0009.

Local Perceptions of Climate Change Impacts in St. Kitts (Caribbean Sea) and Malé, Maldives (Indian Ocean)

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are now experiencing the local consequences of a changing climate, environment, and society. Nonetheless, climate change research frequently remains at regional or national levels. Without locally grounded data, islanders’ perceived impacts of the changes might not be considered, thereby causing difficulties when policy and practice responses are implemented without accounting for local understandings. To contribute to addressing this gap, this study examines perceptions of climate change and associated environmental and social changes in two SIDS case studies: St. Kitts in the Caribbean Sea and Malé Atoll, Maldives in the Indian Ocean. Through these two case studies, we assess perceptions of changing social and natural environments through a closed-question, face-to-face survey. Our results suggest that in both island case studies, communities perceive environmental changes to be happening that demand negotiation with the social changes of daily life. Results also suggest that perceived climate change impacts are only part of the equation, as social and economic impacts reveal two case studies of changing island societies. While the geographic context in each case study differs, this study reveals the perceived impacts of climate change and social changes at a local level, providing valuable insights and angles for formulating policies and actions to deal with the myriad of social and environmental changes affecting SIDS.

Stancioff, Charlotte Eloise — Stojanov, Robert — Kelman, Ilan — Němec, Daniel — Landa, Jaromír — Tichy , Radomir — Procházka, David — Brown, Graeme — Hofman, Corinne L 
Local Perceptions of Climate Change Impacts in St. Kitts (Caribbean Sea) and Malé, Maldives (Indian Ocean). Atmosphere. 2018. v. 9, no. 12, ISSN 2073-4433.

Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives

For the last few decades, Maldives has been seen as being at the forefront of addressing climate change impacts. The low elevation of the islands makes them vulnerable to slow-onset hazards, such as coastal erosion, sea-level rise, salinity intrusion, and change in monsoon patterns and hence rainfall. Consequently, migration has long been discussed as an adaptation strategy for the population. This study covers outcomes from our field research conducted among islanders in Mal e, the capital of Maldives, in 2013. It contributes empirical evidence toward understanding complex relations among environmental challenges, climate change, and migration. We set up two main research questions. The first question explored islanders’ perceptions of impacts of climatic variability in recent years and possible impacts of future climate change. The second question probed whether out-migration from the islands might be considered to be an adaptation strategy and whether the islanders were willing to move outside Maldives due to projected climate change impacts. We conducted our field research in the capital Mal e and nearby residential islands, using quantitative questionnaires with local respondents (N=347). Our results suggest that, besides a set of actually experienced environmental and climate challenges, slow-onset climate change impacts such as sea-level rise are perceived as being one of the key factors affecting Maldivian society and livelihoods. More than 50% of respondents perceive future sea-level rise to be a serious challenge at the national level and they accept that migration from islands to other countries might be a potential option. Conversely, from the individual perspective, sea-level rise is not perceived by the local population as being one of their own important challenges. The reason is that many other factors – cultural, religious, economic and social – play an important role in decisionmaking about migrating or not.

Stojanov, Robert — Duží, Barbora — Kelman, Ilan — Němec, Daniel — Procházka, David
Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives. Geographical Journal. 2017. v. 183, no. 4, p. 370–385. ISSN 0016-7398.

Climate Change and Migration in Maldives

The words climate change, migration, and islands evoke images of “climate change refugees” fleeing from paradise as the ocean mercilessly rises over pristine beaches. These representations rarely hold in reality. Phrases such as “climate refugees” and “climate migrants” are severely criticized in scientific literature, and many islanders object to the terms. Maldives is a perfect case to illustrate how islanders view links between climate change and migration. The country, an Indian Ocean archipelago with 1,190 islands grouped into 26 low-lying coral atolls, has its highest point just 2.4 meters above sea level. Unless policymakers understand the islanders’ thoughts on migration as a climate change adaptation option, efforts to implement climate change adaptation policies are destined to fail, hurting the people whom the policies were designed to help.

Stojanov, Robert — Kelman, Ilan — Procházka, David — Němec, Daniel — Duží, Barbora
Climate Change and Migration in Maldives. Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. 2017. ISSN 1526-0054.

Climate change, resilience and adaptation strategies

The impacts of climate change are here. How can we adapt?

The impacts of climate change, climatic extremes, and climate variability have become more and more known in the last decade. Increasing intensity and frequency of floods, droughts, extremely hot days in Europe or lack of precipitation, tropical storms and sea level rise in Asia, Africa and the Pacific and Indian Ocean is reflected in the growing number of media articles and reports.

We examine the perception, resilience and adaptation strategies of households (i) in rural areas and smaller municipalities in Central Europe that have been repeatedly affected by floods; (ii) between rural and coastal residents in South Asian countries, often affected by floods and hurricanes; (iii) inhabitants of small islands they are threaten by sea level rise.
To solve the above mentioned problems, their exact identification is necessary. Our research focuses primarily on identifying the impacts of climate change as people perceive these changes; as well as on interpretation of their resilience and adaptation strategies with the assistance of a variety of GIT tools and visualization in a geographic environment.

We are involved in solving the following projects in the field of environmental change.

COST Action CA16111: International Ethnic and Immigrant Minorities’ Survey Data Network (2017-2021)

The main goal of this network is to bring together researchers, policy makers, and survey data producers to join efforts to improve the access, usability, dissemination and standards of the multiple and scattered survey data that exist on the economic, social and political integration of ethnic and migrant minorities (EMMs). This Action is both relevant and timely, as it will provide the mechanisms that will enhance the research capacity in Europe in the field of EMMs’ economic, social and political integration, and will allow a solid and evidence based transfer of knowledge to policymakers and civil society organizations about the key consequences and social processes related to the integration of EMMs in European societies and elsewhere. The COST network will focus at once on multiplying research capacity and on transferring knowledge to a multiplicity of audiences and stakeholders.
The network will achieve these goals by compiling, documenting, archiving and pooling a large amount of data coming from various comparable studies conducted around Europe, thus providing the means to improve the empirical basis of high-quality research. Data will be made available on an web-based platform or Data Hub. The Action also includes a specific research training and educational component with the aim of guaranteeing that these coordinated efforts are carried over into the future through the next generations of researchers.
The Action is backed by 47 proposers undertaking research in 20 European countries and the US and its composition is balanced in terms of gender, geography, type of organization and career stage.

COST Action CA16114: Rethinking Sustainability Towards a Regenerative Economy (RESTORE) (2017-2021)

The RESTORE Action will affect a paradigm shift towards restorative sustainability for new and existing buildings, promoting forward thinking and multidisciplinary knowledge, leading to solutions that celebrate the richness of design creativity while enhancing users’ experience, health and wellbeing inside and outside buildings, in harmony with urban ecosystems, reconnecting users to nature.Sustainable buildings and facilities are critical to a future that is socially just, ecologically restorative, culturally rich and economically viable within the climate change context. Despite over a decade of strategies and programmes, progress on built environment sustainability fails to address these key issues. Consequently the built environment sector no longer has the luxury of being incrementally less bad, but, with urgency, needs to adopt net-positive, restorative sustainability thinking to incrementally do ‘more good’.Within the built environment sustainability agenda a shift is occurring, from a narrow focus on building energy performance, mitigation strategies, and minimisation of environmental impacts to a broader framework that enriches places, people, ecology, culture, and climate at the core of the design task, with particular emphasis on the benefits towards health.

COST Action CA15217: Ocean Governance for Sustainability – challenges, options and the role of science (2016-2020)

The governance of oceanic systems and coastlines is moving into the center of European strategic and sustainability interests. The network aims to establish an integrative vision, and a series of approaches that informs research and future policy directions on crosscutting sustainability-driven issues related to the fragmented governance framework of oceans, seas and coastlines within regional waters, and the open ocean in areas beyond national jurisdiction.
The network differs from thematic predecessors in two distinct ways: While attending to the multiple flows and connectivities between varied marine systems together with land- and sea-based interfaces that are biologically, culturally, politically and socio-economically entwined, it first renders equal importance to strengthening regional and interdisciplinary dialogue, producing scientific output, crosscutting the natural and social sciences. Synergistic issue-driven working groups will be created at a time when Europe is considering its role in global ocean governance, and will continue to evolve well after the COST Action ends. Second, the network creates a distinct multi-scalar and cross-sectoral platform for institutional partners across academia, policymaking and civil society, presenting inclusive spaces for transdicsiplinary dialogue, capacity development and the advancement of practical toolkits that attend to science-policy gaps inherent within integrated ocean and coastal governance.
web: https://www.oceangov.eu

COST Action CA16233: DRYLANDS FACING CHANGE: INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH ON CLIMATE CHANGE, FOOD INSECURITY, POLITICAL INSTABILITY (2017-2021)

The main goal of this network is to bring together researchers, policy makers, and survey data producers to join efforts to improve the access, usability, dissemination and standards of the multiple and scattered survey data that exist on the economic, social and political integration of ethnic and migrant minorities (EMMs). This Action is both relevant and timely, as it will provide the mechanisms that will enhance the research capacity in Europe in the field of EMMs’ economic, social and political integration, and will allow a solid and evidence based transfer of knowledge to policymakers and civil society organizations about the key consequences and social processes related to the integration of EMMs in European societies and elsewhere. The COST network will focus at once on multiplying research capacity and on transferring knowledge to a multiplicity of audiences and stakeholders.
The network will achieve these goals by compiling, documenting, archiving and pooling a large amount of data coming from various comparable studies conducted around Europe, thus providing the means to improve the empirical basis of high-quality research. Data will be made available on an web-based platform or Data Hub. The Action also includes a specific research training and educational component with the aim of guaranteeing that these coordinated efforts are carried over into the future through the next generations of researchers.
The Action is backed by 47 proposers undertaking research in 20 European countries and the US and its composition is balanced in terms of gender, geography, type of organization and career stage.